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Aug 8th

Nomato sauce to fool your Nonna.

Posted by with Comments Off on Nomato sauce to fool your Nonna.

upset-senior-woman-wooden-spoon-7826441One thing that is absolutely clear to anyone that has shared a meal with me is that I love good food, also that I hate poser food, you’re not fooling anyone portobello burger! I honestly feel that we should love on food for what it is, and we can totally enjoy a grilled portobello without trying to pretend its meat.

Since starting AIP I have steered clear of recipes and meals that are pretending to be something their not, that is until my grandma arrived to visit for the summer and big family meals became an almost weekly occurrence. Sunday lunch in my Italian hybrid family consists of heaps of pasta and my moms outrageously delicious tomato sauce, both of which are strictly forbidden on the AIP protocol. How on earth was I going to navigate this one?

An online search of some recipes gave me some good ideas, but didn’t really convince me and I was determined that my sauce not taste like beets (aka dirt!) or vegetable soup. Having made sauce since I could balance on a stepping stool to reach the counter I know that good sauce has some key components.

  1. a perfect balance of sweet, salty and sour
  2. rich deep flavours
  3. time. There are no shortcuts, a good sauce has to cook for a while.

 

With this in mind and all my culinary skills ready to be tested to the max I set out to create a Nomato sauce to fool a Nonna.

 

Ingredientsnomato3

  • 2 medium yams with peel
  • 3 large carrots
  • 5 cloves of garlic
  • 2 medium beets
  • 2 medium sweet onions
  • 1/2 Lb beef cut into cubes
  • oil (coconut or other for pan and basting veggies)
  • 2 cups bone broth
  • 1 cup apple cider vinegar
  • Salt
  • basil (to taste)
  • 3 bay leaves
  • olive oil (approximately 2 Tbs) *save this as you will drizzle after the sauce is cooked!

Method

  1. Slice yams, carrot, beets and garlic into slices and spread out on a pan. Baste with oil. I like to add a little water to the pan as they roast so that they don’t dry out.Roast at 375F until tender 25-30 min depending on the thickness of your slices.
  2. While the veggies are roasting, dice onions and saute with a little oil until browned.
  3. Add beef to pan and saute with the onions to brown.
  4. When veggies are done roasting, transfer to food processor or blender and add 2 cups of cold bone broth.
  5. Pure in the blender until smooth.
  6. add pureed veggies to pan and stir with onions and beef to combine.
  7. Transfer sauce to a slow cooker and set on low.
  8. Stir in Cider vinegar, salt, basil and bay leaves.
  9. Slow cook for 6 hrs. while you read a book, or take a nap.
  10. once sauce is ready turn off slow cooker and add a generous drizzle of olive oil.

 

Serve over zoodles, on AIP pizza crust or anything else your heart desires!

 

Buon Appetito!

 

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Feb 2th

February is a great month for Soups!

Posted by with Comments Off on February is a great month for Soups!

A bowl of goodness…5ea7aad3-3939-4f76-974f-70505d8ce0f0

I grew up in a house where everything was made from scratch, including a wondrous variety of fresh soups. I never even tried canned soup till Iwas in my 20s. My mom would wait for us on cold winter days with hot vegetable soup for lunch. These soups would look kind of horrible with big gobs of cooked spinach floating like seaweed on top. The taste was, however out of this world. It didn’t take long for classmates to follow us home and soon my mom has half the grade 2 class sitting in the dining room enjoying her wholesome soup.

As soon as fall hits here in southern Ontario I find the soup pot beckoning and the creative juices flowing. Soup is so wonderously easy, nutritious and comforting in the winter that there is no excuse for even a novice cook to try making it. Here are some simple fool proof recipes

Simple broth

Most good soups benefit from a solid base of homemade broth. Bone broth is mineral rich and certainly the newest fad in food this winter. There are plenty of good tutorials out these on making proper bone broth that pulls all the nutrients out from the bones, however you can still make a simple and flavourful broth for basic noodle soup or as a soup base without too much fuss.

Ingredients.facebook_1423771693611_resized

  • 1 Chicken carcass or soup bone
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 1 onion
  • 1 potato
  • 1 yam or piece of squash (or both)
  • 1 carrot
  • Salt to taste- start with 1-2 tsp and add more if needed

Method

Wash and quarter vegetables (no need to peel) Smash garlic cloves and toss everything into a deep (at least 5L )stock pot with the bones. Fill with water till about 2 inches from the top. Set on the stove and bring to a boil then simmer covered for about 3hrs. After about 1 hr the bones will be cooked and you can taste the broth and adjust salt. once the broth reaches the desired strength, strain out vegetables and bones. You can now use this to make a basic noodle soup or store in mason jars in the fridge to use in recipes. You can eat the veggies if you wish, they are delicious.

If the broth is too weak– simmer with the lid off for a bit to reduce the liquid and concentrate the flavours

If the broth is too strong- add some fresh water and simmer for 20-30 min to amalgamate flavours

Broth too salty- add a little fresh water and a whole peeled potato, the potato will help absorb the extra salt..

 

Back to your roots Vegan soup

This is my go to winter soup. Its hearty and filling, filled with nutrients and super quick and easy to make. I love taking it to work with me in a thermos as the quinoa doesn’t get mushy.

Ingredients

  • 1 large potato
  • 1 large yam
  • 1 small squash (any kind but spaghetti)
  • 2 cloves of garlic peeled and smashed
  • 1 onion peeled
  • 1 large carrot
  • 1 large turnip
  • Salt to taste
  • handful of Quinoa (washed)
  • 2 Tbs coconut oil, MCT oil or grass fed butter (if you aren’t vegan) optional

2014-10-09 21.48.33_resizedMethod

Peel and chop vegetables and place all ingredients except quinoa and coconut oil  to a 5L pot. fill pot with fresh water and set to simmer over med heat till vegetables are tender or about 30-40 minutes. Remove from heat and use a potato masher to mash vegetables right in the pot or pulse with an immersion blender until desired consistency is reached. I like the slightly chunky texture of the potato masher. If at this point the soup is too thick you can thin it with a little water, remember the quinoa will thicken it further. Add the handful of quinoa and stir. Return to heat and simmer for 15 minutes to cook quinoa. Once the quinoa is cooked you can add the oil or butter and combine.

 

Tomato Garlic Shiitake soup

Tomato soup is one of the simplest things ever. I love its tangy taste and I swear shiitakes were made to be paired with tomato! Both the garlic and shiitake mushrooms are powerful immune boosters making this soup ideal for winter. You can serve it with croutons and a little coconut cream for a delicious and decadent lunch. This can easily be made into a vegetarian or vegan option. You can peel and seed the tomatoes to give you a nicer texture, but I am a little lazy and just made it with the tomatoes as is.

Ingredients20150212_115336_resized

  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 1 onion
  • 2 Tbs coconut oil
  • 7-8 large field tomatoes (peeled and seeded)
  • 2 cups of broth (your choice vegetable or beef/chicken will work)
  • 5-6 shiitake mushrooms (fresh or dried)
  • 1 cup of milk (whole cow, or coconut milk)
  • salt to taste
  • coconut cream (optional)

Method

Chop onion and garlic and place into a large saucepan with coconut oil. Cook until just lightly browned. Add the peeled and seeded tomatoes and cook over med heat until tomatoes are soft. Add broth and shiitake mushrooms and simmer for 15- 20 minutes. If using dried mushrooms make sure they have been properly rehydrated before continuing. Allow soup to cool a bit so you can blend it safely. Add milk and blend with either a standard blender (in batches) or an immersion blender in the pot until smooth. Return to simmer for  about 5 min to heat through. Ladle into bowls and serve with croutons and a drizzle of coconut cream if desired.

 

Cooking at home and from scratch with whole foods is one of the best things you can do to improve your health. Cooking does not have to be complicated or intimidating and I believe anyone can learn. Cooking meals as a family deepens the parent/child bond, teaches children a valuable life skill and creates a deep connection to food as a source of comfort and nutrition. Cooking at home saves you money, helps maintain a healthy weight and is deeply empowering. If you would like to learn more about healing with whole foods, book an appointment for a nutritional consult and we can discuss your individual goals and needs.

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